¿Ves todos los idiomas arriba? Traducimos las historias de Global Voices para que los medios ciudadanos del mundo estén disponibles para todos.

Entérate más sobre Traducciones Lingua  »

Israel, Líbano: Bloggers rusoparlantes debaten sobre el trato de intercambio de prisioneros

Mientras que algunos bloggers de la antigua Unión Soviética se interesan por los asuntos de Medio Oriente debido a una vana (o no tan vana) curiosidad, para otros Israel es su hogar, y no resulta extraño que el intercambio de prisioneros del 16 de julio entre Israel y Líbano no pasase desapercibido en la blogosfera de habla rusa.

El usuario de LJ dolboeb, Anton Nossik, un ciudadano israelí residente en Moscú, sumamente conocido como un «Evangelizador en Redes Sociales en SUP», la compañía de medios online que posee LiveJournal.com – publicó este comentario en su blog el 17 de julio:

Israel: Capitulation

Israelis today have exchanged [Samir Kuntar] for the remains of two soldiers who died in 2006.

The shame and disgust which I feel because of this deal are impossible to describe in words.

And for once, I don’t even have the moral right to reproach the nasty journalist of the International Herald Tribune who wrote this in his piece about Kuntar:

Samir Kuntar, will return to a hero's welcome when he crosses into Lebanon this week, 29 years after he left its shores in a rubber dinghy to kidnap Israelis from the coastal town of Nahariya.

That raid went horribly wrong, leaving five people dead, a community terrorized and a nation traumatized. Two Israeli children and their father were among those killed.

The straightforward message here is that the journalist does not see anything horribly wrong about the actual idea of kidnapping [Nahariya] residents by the terrorists, and that no tragedy would have occurred had Kuntar and his associates managed to kidnap this same family and take it away to Lebanon.

But how can we have a grudge against the American journo when both president [Shimon Peres] (who pardoned Kuntar) and prime minister [Ehud Olmert] (who secured a triumphal return to his [Hizbullah] comrades-in-arms for him) see nothing horribly wrong with how everything turned out to be in Nahariya 29 years ago.

In this connection, it seems relevant to mention that in 1985, Palestinian terrorists hijacked a whole ship, [Achille Lauro], with 400 passengers on board, also demanding freedom for Samir Kuntar. But 23 years ago, Israeli leadership had the balls. The ship was liberated and the terrorists captured. And this kept Palestinian militants from taking hostages again for a long time. Now, everything’s changed. And I’m afraid that the price that the whole Israel will have to pay for the shameful Samir Kuntar deal may turn out to be higher than what’s been paid for all the past adventures of Olmert and Peres.

Israel: capitulación

Los israelíes han intercambiado hoy a [Samir Kuntar] por los restos mortales de dos soldados que murieron en el 2006.

La vergüenza y la repulsión que siento por culpa de este trato son imposibles de describir con palabras.

Y por una vez, no tengo ni el derecho moral de reprochar al ruin reportero del International Herald Tribune que escribió esto en su artículo sobre Kuntar:

Samir Kuntar, volverá a una bienvenida triunfal cuando cruce a Líbano esta semana, 29 años después de dejar sus costas en una balsa de goma para secuestrar a israelíes de la ciudad costera de Nahariya.

Esa redada salió terriblemente mal, ya que dejó cinco muertos, una comunidad aterrorizada y una nación traumatizada. Dos niños israelíes y su padre estaban entre esos muertos.

El mensaje directo aquí es que el reportero no ve nada horriblemente malo sobre la propia idea de que los terroristas secuestren a habitantes de [Nahariya], y que no habría ocurrido ninguna tragedia si Kuntar y sus socios hubiesen conseguido secuestrar a esta misma familia y llevársela al Líbano.

Pero cómo podemos tener rencor al periodista estadounidense cuando tanto el presidente [Shimon Peres] (que indultó a Kuntar) como el primer ministro [Ehud Ólmert] (que se aseguró un regreso triunfal con sus compañeros de armas de [Hezbolá]) no ven nada horriblemente malo con cómo acabó todo en Nahariya hace 29 años.

A este respecto, parece relevante señalar que en 1985, los terroristas palestinos secuestraron un barco entero, [Achille Lauro], con 400 pasajeros a bordo, y también demandaron libertad para Samir Kuntar. Pero hace 23 años, el mando israelí tuvo arrojo. Se liberó el barco y se capturaron a los terroristas. Y esto contuvo a los milicianos palestinos de tomar rehenes durante mucho tiempo. Pero ahora todo ha cambiado. Y tengo miedo de que el precio que todo Israel tendrá que pagar por el vergonzoso trato de Samir Kuntar pueda acabar siendo mayor que lo que se ha pagado por las aventuras pasadas de Olmert y Peres.

Esta publicación ha generado 344 comentarios. A continuación se recogen partes de un debate que, entre otras cosas, destaca las posibles implicaciones del trato de intercambio de prisioneros para Gilad Shalit, un soldado israelí de 21 años que ha sido tomado rehén por Hamás desde el 25 de junio de 2006:

igrok2:

Does it have to do with religion? That is, are the soldiers’ remains so valuable only from a religious point of view?

[…]

rjiyxapb:

First of all, they are priceless for the relatives of the killed ones, IMHO…

jerusalea:

Not really. In the Torah, there is even a prohibition to pay ransom for those who are alive if this is likely to lead to new kidnappings of Jews. It’s not about religion. At least, not about Judaism. And I can’t explain what kind of nonsense this is. My [LJ friends’ blogs] are full of a communal howling that this is just idiotic behavior. And two thirds of my [mutual LJ friends] are religious Jews. And everyone is ashamed and disgusted.

[…]

haraz_bey:

No, [it’s not about religion]. It’s just that no one knew for sure whether they were dead or alive – for Israel, this has been a blind exchange. If they had known for sure that there’d be dead bodies, they most likely would have canceled the exchange.

[…]

dolboeb:

I don’t know about everyone. But I knew that the deal was about the remains [of the soldiers]. I learned it from the open-access press. From the Russian press. I don’t believe that Olmert and Peres did not know.

haraz_bey:

Perhaps, Olmert and Peres don’t read the Russian press :) [That they were dead] was, of course, the most obvious assumption, and the press is always putting forward the gloomiest forecasts. But as long as their fate was unknown, there remained a chance that they would be alive.

[…]

yakov_sirotkin:

Actually, according to the Christian tradition, for example, to pardon criminals is not considered impossible. Nonetheless, I think that bandits should always be called bandits, even the pardoned ones, but I do not see any confirmation that the Israeli leadership is clearing the bandits of their guilt.

It’s sad to read comments with suggestions to kill someone – this will only result in a non-stop cycle of violence and terrorism.

As for the exchange of live human beings for the dead ones, the very fact of trade in corpses seems [barbarous].

dolboeb:

[…]

You’re looking in the wrong direction.

The problem isn’t in paying ransom for the corpses. The problem is in admission that we are ready to pay the same price for a live prisoner in the form of a corpse as what we would have paid had he been alive.

After such an admission, not a single reason remains to keep him alive. After such an admission, the price of [Gilad Shalit’s] life equals the daily cost of feeding him.

[…]

anreality:

IMHO, all this noise isn’t worth […] the time wasted on it. A huge pile of [feces] has been taken out of my country, where it was being kept on my money, too, and the animal was being fed, educated and kept safe, instead of quietly rotting somewhere.

And no matter how you look at it, by announcing to the whole world that this creature is a hero, Hizbullah is not likely to draw more sympathizers, and even the current ones may possibly think twice.

And to return the soldiers by exchanging them for [feces] is good in any case.

And nothing but annihilation will take away their taste for taking hostages.

dolboeb:

It would be very good if you were there instead of Gilad Shalit.

But, unfortunately, this isn’t so.

In Gilad Shalit’s place is Gilad Shalit, a corporal of the Israel Defense Forces. And you are in the place of someone who is ready to pay for [Gilad Shalit’s] body as much as for a live soldier. Judging by how categorically you sound, you must be a [draft dodger].

It really would have been better the other way around.

[…]

anglofilka:

Somehow it seems to me that the Israelis are not done with this Kuntar story yet. One quiet summer night he’d just be shot somewhere, without any noise. This step, crazy from the perspective of sane people, has given Israel a huge advantage in the international political arena. And it has taken away many points from Hizbullah. Now it’s possible to bargain with America, there’s a moral right to strike Iran, etc. – everything will be tolerated. But, unfortunately, the life of Shalit is nothing but an exchangeable coin.

igrok2:

¿Tiene que ver con la religión? ¿Quiero decir, los restos mortales de los soldados son tan valiosos únicamente desde un punto de vista religioso?

[…]

rjiyxapb:

Primero, son de un valor incalculable para los familiares de los asesinados, en mi humilde opinión…

jerusalea:

Realmente no. En la Torá, incluso hay una prohibición a pagar un rescate a aquellos que están vivos si ello probablemente conduce a nuevos secuestros de judíos. No es sobre religión. Al menos, no sobre judaísmo. Y no puedo explicar el sinsentido que es esto. Mis [blogs de amigos de LJ] están repletos de un clamor comunal de que esto es un comportamiento idiota. Y dos tercios de mis [amigos mutuos de LJ] son judíos religiosos. Y todo el mundo está avergonzado e indignado.

[…]

haraz_bey:

No, [no es sobre religión]. Es solo que nadie sabía con seguridad si estaban muertos o vivos, para Israel, esto ha sido un intercambio a ciegas. Si hubiesen sabido con seguridad que habría muertos, seguramente hubiesen cancelado el intercambio.

[…]

dolboeb:

No sé todo el mundo. Pero yo sabía que el trato era sobre los restos mortales [de los soldados]. Lo aprendí gracias a la prensa de acceso abierto. De la prensa rusa. No creo que Olmert y Peres no lo supiesen.

haraz_bey:

Quizás, Olmert y Peres no leen la prensa rusa :) [Que estaban muertos] era, por supuesto, la suposición más obvia, y la prensa siempre tiende a reportar las predicciones más pesimistas. Pero mientras no se conociese su destino, existía una posibilidad de que estuviesen vivos.

[…]

yakov_sirotkin:

En realidad, según la tradición cristiana, por ejemplo, no se considera imposible indultar a criminales. Sin embargo, creo que los bandidos siempre deberían ser llamados bandidos, incluso los indultados, pero no veo ninguna confirmación de que el mando israelí esté absolviendo a los bandidos de su culpa.

Es triste leer comentarios con sugerencias de matar a alguien, esto solo resultará en un ciclo imparable de violencia y terrorismo.

En cuanto al intercambio de personas vivas por muertas, el mero hecho de comerciar en cadáveres parece [bárbaro].

dolboeb:

[…]

Lo estás viendo de la forma equivocada.

El problema no está en pagar un rescate por los cadáveres. El problema está en la admisión de que estamos preparados para pagar el mismo precio por un prisionero vivo en forma de cadáver de lo que habríamos pagado si estuviese vivo.

Después de tal admisión, no existe ninguna razón para manternerle vivo. Después de tal admisión, el precio de la vida de [Gilad Shalit] es igual al coste diario de alimentarle.

[…]

anreality:

En mi humilde opinión, todo este ruido no merece […] el tiempo que se ha gastado. Se ha sacado una enorme pila de [heces] de mi país, y estaba aquí con mi dinero, también, y el animal se estaba alimentando y estaba a salvo, en vez de pudrirse discretamente en algún lugar.

Y sin importar cómo lo mires, por anunciar a todo el mundo que esta critaura es un héroe, probablemente Hezbolá no consiga más simpatizantes, e incluso los actuales se lo pueden pensar dos veces.

Y recuperar a los soldados intercambiándolos por [heces] es bueno de cualquier manera.

Y solamente la aniquilación acabará con su gusto a la toma de rehenes.

dolboeb:

Estaría bien que estuvieses allí en vez de Gilad Shalit.

Pero, desafortunadamente, no es el caso.

En el lugar de Gilad Shalit está Gilad Shalit, un cabo de las Fuerzas de Defensa de Israel. Y tú estás en el lugar de alguien que está preparado para pagar por el cuerpo de [Gilad Shalit] tanto como por el de un soldado vivo. Juzgando la forma categórica en la que suenas, debes ser un [desertor].

Realmente habría sido mejor de la otra manera.

[…]

anglofilka:

De alguna manera me parece que los israelíes no han terminado con esta historia de Kuntar todavía. Una tranquila noche de verano le dispararán en algún lugar, sin ningún ruido. Este paso, loco desde la perspectiva de las personas cuerdas, le ha dado a Israel una ventaja enorme en el área política internacional. Y le ha quitado muchos puntos a Hezbolá. Ahora es posible negociar con EE. UU., existe un derecho moral a atacar a Irán, etc., se tolerará todo. Pero, desafortunadamente, la vida de Shallit no es más que una moneda canjeable.

Inicie la conversación

Autores, por favor Conectarse »

Guías

  • Por favor trate a los demás con respeto. Comentarios conteniendo ofensas, obscenidades y ataque personales no serán aprobados.